Don’t Talk to Strangers

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Photo Credit – The Strangers

While my horror-related haul wasn’t as sprawling this Christmas as it was last Christmas, I still received a few terrifying tokens in my stocking this year.  Among them, Michael got me the 2005 movie The Strangers starring Liv Tyler.  Michael is a considerable Liv Tyler fan but held off on seeing this particular movie for over a decade because it looked too scary.  This gift was thus twofold: he bought me the DVD and, bonus, resolved to watch it with me, despite resisting this action repeatedly over the course of our two plus year relationship.  While Michael was terrified throughout the whole film, my feathers remained surprisingly unruffled.  I do find the film intriguing, however, for its exploration of senseless human malice.

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Don’t Talk to Strangers

Problematic Presumptions in The Purge

purge oneAhhhh, election year.  This year, Americans get to see an irascible, iridescent orange man with floppy straw hair standing behind a podium spewing vitriol and grandiosity while waving (rumor has it) little sausage fingers.  And his harlequin fantasies of “having them” build a wall to “protect” our border (somehow, “we’re not gonna build it, they’re gonna build it,” he asserts) and banning over one billion members of a major, 1,406-year-old religion from entering our country, while punishing women who seek abortions, might make some wonder, what will he think of next?  There are myriad possibilities.  While I don’t think what I’m about to suggest would actually happen, policy ideas like his make me imagine, wildly, that anything could happen.  Perhaps he would legalize one night a year for murder, to let resentful Americans release their stores of seething hatred.  And if that were to happen, we’ll have Ethan Hawke and The Purge series to thank, a semi-dystopian horror series about what would happen if all crime was legal for one night of the year, including the big “Red Rum.” Continue reading “Problematic Presumptions in The Purge”

Problematic Presumptions in The Purge