My First Viewing of Freaks (1932)

Freaks Three
Cleo faux-flirting with Hans in Freaks

Before I started studying horror as a path toward getting a doctorate, I’d never heard of Tod Browning’s Freaks.  In fact, I’d only vaguely heard of Tod Browning.  I’d seen his 1931 rendition of Dracula, featuring Bela Lugosi, one fall night quite a few years ago, when Tinseltown was doing a double feature of Browning’s Dracula, followed by the far superior Spanish version of the film shot the same year (on the same set, but at night, with a different director).  I suppose back then I thought of myself as a bit of a horror connoisseur, but perhaps I was basking in my own ego – and that ego was eclipsing all my knowledge of what I didn’t know.  Because what I’ve learned since I started reading about horror is that Tod Browning is considered a central auteur in the horror field.  In terms of horror cinema, he’s easily one of the genre’s founders, and with good (varying) reasons. Continue reading “My First Viewing of Freaks (1932)”

My First Viewing of Freaks (1932)

All Vamped Out: Some Thoughts on the 1931 Version of Bram Stoker’s Dracula

DraculaThe local cinema was showing a Turner Classic Movie Dracula double feature: Tod Browning’s 1931, black and white version of Dracula, and the 1931 Spanish version of Dracula.  Of course there was no question; I was going to attend the event.  I’ll be honest:  I brought my trusty notepad with me, and I tried to scribble some comments in the pitch black theater while I was watching Bella Lugosi prey on the necks of fair young maidens.  Now I love a good black and white movie, if done well.  The 1963 version of The Haunting is one of my favorite horror movies, and I’ve been dying to see The Innocents.  But I’m hesitant to say that I’m a huge Dracula fan.  Don’t get me wrong – I enjoy seeing Bella Lugosi arch his eyebrows – but something about the film seemed incomplete.  The script was catchy, with quotable lines, but Browning’s film lacked the character development I find central to a truly well-made film.

Continue reading “All Vamped Out: Some Thoughts on the 1931 Version of Bram Stoker’s Dracula”

All Vamped Out: Some Thoughts on the 1931 Version of Bram Stoker’s Dracula