Objects of Abjection: The Mad Monster in Stephen King’s Misery

Misery book 1I read Stephen King’s Misery earlier this summer for my comprehensive exams.  Then, I let the book rest for a while and didn’t do much with it.  It juxtaposes fascinatingly with the film, which depicts an Annie Wilkes who’s incredibly true to King’s story, courtesy of the monumentally talented Kathy Bates.  And, like the film, it explores concepts like female madness, and madness depicted as monstrosity, but in more depth than the film does.  Wilkes is at least a somewhat complex character who King—and his protagonist, Paul Sheldon—come close to virtually humanizing at times, despite her atrocious actions.  But the fact remains: Annie Wilkes is a madwoman, and she’s depicted as a monstrous madwoman.  I thought I’d use this post to look at more of Annie’s personality, and what the madwoman—and the monster woman—is, if we take Annie as an example of both.  So, let’s do this. Continue reading “Objects of Abjection: The Mad Monster in Stephen King’s Misery”

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Objects of Abjection: The Mad Monster in Stephen King’s Misery

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

frakenstein-novelOn the rare occasion that I write about a novel – especially a classic novel – on this horror site, I balk at the prospect.  Reviewing a movie – even analyzing some of its salient components – is fairly easy, but how does one “review” a classic work of literature?  To what extent am I just writing a paper?  Who am I to say whether Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is a great piece of literature?  Haven’t preceding generations already decided that?  And what in God’s name am I going to say about this novel that is original?  Such hesitant speculation deterred me from writing for about a day after I finished the text, but since I haven’t written for my beloved website for over a month, and since I just read frickin’ Frankenstein, it was hard to justify my lassitude on a permanent basis.

Continue reading “Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein”

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein