Knock Knock. “Who’s there?” Another. “Another Who?” Another Lustful Man Down for the Count.

knock knock threeMen.  Let me tell you.  When it comes to instinctual animal pleasure, they just can’t control themselves.  In fact, they’ll quickly forfeit home and hearth for the wiles of any given anonymous temptress.  And don’t even get me started about women, man’s downfall, those brazen homewreckers who are quick to “break a boy just because [they] can,” as Fiona Apple sang in her 90’s hit, Criminal.  Humanity.  (Sigh).  What a contestable, corrupt, lowly lot we are.  We may as well abandon our attempts at monogamy, send our worst beings on a mission to Mars, and breed another world of insatiable, pleasure-seeking, polygamous – or cheating – inhabitants.  At least, maybe, Earth can look comparatively moral. Continue reading “Knock Knock. “Who’s there?” Another. “Another Who?” Another Lustful Man Down for the Count.”

Knock Knock. “Who’s there?” Another. “Another Who?” Another Lustful Man Down for the Count.

Goodnight Mommy: The Spoiler Free Review

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Photo Credit – Goodnight Mommy

I hadn’t realized the deficit until I saw the film, but it had been an astonishingly long while since I’d felt uneasy and mildly nauseated for almost two hours.  You see, most American horror does wonders with jump scares and shock elements, but the Austrian-created Goodnight, Mommy starts by planting the bud of mild unease somewhere in your mind and in your gut, and then manages, assiduously throughout the film, to water and nourish that bud.  By the end – at least, if you’re anything like me – you’re burying your head in your boyfriend’s shoulder (okay, a little pathetic, but in my defense, the film was very unsettling) and peeking up at the screen with a timid, wary eye. Continue reading “Goodnight Mommy: The Spoiler Free Review”

Goodnight Mommy: The Spoiler Free Review

“What a Lovely Throat!” – Getting Nosferatu’s Ultimate Hickey

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Photo Credit – Nosferatu, 1922

One year, at the suggestion of another teacher, I required my Advanced Placement Literature students to read Edith Hamilton’s Mythology.  Hamilton was a serious scholar who compiled myths from varied sources and combined them into relatively easy to read, concise packages that, lined up one after another, formed a fat, enticing book.  I was so compelled, as a 25-year-old, by the magical stories in her text, that I’d sit in my bedroom all night, reading, underlining, and scribbling notes in the book’s margins.  I’d set the book down every so often and take manic walks in my pajama pants around Montrose, an artsy neighborhood in Houston, Texas, while listening to Joan Baez on my IPod and letting my mind roam.  My decision to walk around Nosferatu 1downtown Houston at night was not a product of common sense or concern for safety, but I suppose none of the horror movie’s I’d watched up to that point properly indoctrinated me with a rational fear of the dark, or of other people.  (I was watching The Ring on repeat then, so I likely thought that it was more dangerous to sit in front of the television – lest an evil little girl crawl out – than it was to walk outside.)  Then, I’d hurry back in the house, run to my bedroom with its deep, maroon walls and black and brown bookshelves from Target, and re-enter the world of myth.   Continue reading ““What a Lovely Throat!” – Getting Nosferatu’s Ultimate Hickey”

“What a Lovely Throat!” – Getting Nosferatu’s Ultimate Hickey

Crazy for Caligari: Exploring Early Horror Cinema

 

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Photo Credit – The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari

I suppose I’ve been intrigued by The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari ever since I realized it took slot #1 on Rotten Tomato’s Best Horror Movies of All Time List.  Unsurprisingly, this list is heavily contested.  Commentators will complain, for example, that King Kong sits in slot #5, even though it’s not technically a horror movie.  The same might be said of Abre Los Ojos – the Spanish version, and, for that matter, the original version of Cameron Crowe’s Vanilla Sky – and Frankenweenie, which I can only assume doesn’t fall under the category of true blue horror.  Still, every ranking is subjective, and even if I questioned the list maker’s assessment, I still had to see what it was about this old, silent, black and white film, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, that makes it such a monumental hit according to a major contemporary movie review site. Continue reading “Crazy for Caligari: Exploring Early Horror Cinema”

Crazy for Caligari: Exploring Early Horror Cinema

11 Reasons to See The Darkness

the darknessAfter I watched The Darkness last night with my boyfriend, Michael, he asked me what I thought.  Answering honestly I said, “Well, it was a little cliché and culturally insensitive, but I expected that.  Overall, it was a fun movie.”  All of this is true, which raises the question: Why—especially as a horror fan drawn to artsy and unique horror movies, like The Shining and It Follows, and even cult classics like Black Sunday—would I advocate seeing The Darkness?  An apt question, to be sure, and one that seems daunting to answer in an essay-style blog entry.  After all, I haven’t written for online publication in months; I’ve been simultaneously exploring the realms of literature and online fashion, spattered with a little journaling, but certainly without the added pressure of writing for an audience.  So I’m easing back into the writing life with a notorious, and I hope, not too cop-outish – see that word I made up? – top  11 list.  (Because, why create a top 10 list when you can create a top 11 list?)  Here are 11 reasons why you should see The Darkness, which came out in theaters this Friday, the 13thContinue reading “11 Reasons to See The Darkness”

11 Reasons to See The Darkness

The Witch is Back

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Photo Credit – A24 Films “The Witch”

I waited in anticipation for The Witch. I don’t know what to liken the anticipation to, except to say that it must be a milder version of the excitement I felt for major holidays when I was younger. Maybe I was almost as excited to see The Witch as I was for the second half of season six of The Walking Dead to arrive.   I mean, come on, a horror film that won “Best Director” at the Sundance film festival? How rare that someone manages to combine truly artistic, original filmmaking with the horror genre. And then there’s that trailer that appeared in the theaters and online, in which a girl is playing peek-a-boo with a baby, only to open her eyes and find that the baby has disappeared. Good film-making. Witches. Disappearing babies. What else could a self-avowed horror addict request? Continue reading “The Witch is Back”

The Witch is Back

Pride and Prejudice and Zombies: Pretty Much What I’d Expected

ppzI haven’t read Pride and Prejudice and Zombies.  However, as I entered the theater to see the film, I expected a version Pride and Prejudice that took place in the 19th century but reflected directorial styles and preferences of the present day, along with, well, along with zombies.  By and large, I got what I expected.  The movie was fairly attention-grabbing with fairly likable characters and a fairly original plot, which is to say, the film was interesting and fun, but far from exceptional.  I think, though, that the film’s worth a view, for what it’s trying to do – combine our contemporary zombie-mania with classical literature to create a new and rare form of storytelling that pays heed to that which has come before and combines it with that which is popular now.  The movie – and, presumably the book – try to resurrect classical literature into the realm of pop culture, with intriguing, though not compelling, ramifications.  Continue reading “Pride and Prejudice and Zombies: Pretty Much What I’d Expected”

Pride and Prejudice and Zombies: Pretty Much What I’d Expected