The Just Dread-Full Poetry Corner: The Understated Horror of “Dream Within A Dream”

Dream Within a Dream One
Edgar Allan Poe

I admit, it’s been a long time since I’ve talked about Poe on this blog.  And while I’ve discussed two of his short stories (The Masque of the Red Death and The Black Cat), I’ve never dealt with his poetry on Just Dread-full before.  In fact, I haven’t read his poetry (or, you know, his Poe-etry), in quite some time, and I certainly haven’t read it all.  I was consulting my mental rolodex of Poe poems that I have read, with the aid of a little online research, but I wasn’t finding “the right one” to write about today.  Then it occurred to me – something I always try to remember with this blog – that horror is an expansive category that includes many works of art that don’t mirror our contemporary definition of horror (for example, I’ve been wanting to explore some of the earliest Gothic novels for a while, but haven’t done so yet.) As such, I decided to write about Poe’s poem, “Dream Within a Dream.”  This poem is fascinating because, if one really grapples with the implications and philosophical underpinnings of what Poe suggests, the prospect is, indeed, terrifying.  On the other hand, the poem has a rich, sonorous voice and is mesmerizingly beautiful.  To me, such a combination is both a phenomenal achievement and a hallmark of much of Poe’s poetry: The ability to leave us remarkably unsettled (and often sad) while producing a poem that is unusually aesthetically appealing. Continue reading “The Just Dread-Full Poetry Corner: The Understated Horror of “Dream Within A Dream””

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The Just Dread-Full Poetry Corner: The Understated Horror of “Dream Within A Dream”

The Big Ten: Looking Back on Some Popular Just Dread-Full Posts

Jaelyn's LogoWell, it’s official.  I’ve written an uneven 73 posts on Just Dread-Full since the blog’s inception in late October of 2015.  Now, before I continue, I had a different introduction written in this piece, but the ghost of Miss Jessel is apparently bitter about how I depicted her in my piece on The Innocents, because she’s crawled out of the movie and consumed my laptop.  Really.  Michael and I lost my laptop in the transition from his parents’ house to his house (one of us was carrying the bag).  We, and his parents, have searched every conceivable place, and it’s simply disappeared. As such, I’m typing from his laptop, and I have to start this piece over again.

Continue reading “The Big Ten: Looking Back on Some Popular Just Dread-Full Posts”

The Big Ten: Looking Back on Some Popular Just Dread-Full Posts

Exploring Poe-tential Evil in “The Black Cat”

black catNot surprisingly, Poe mentions madness early in the story “The Black Cat.”  It’s kind of his shtick.  He starts where many horror writers start: at the end of the story, with a narrator recounting a tale of terror and travesty.  But unlike narrators in other stories, this narrator is damned by the events of the tale, and perhaps seeks solace in his retelling.  Also unlike narrators in other stories, he’s not sitting around a fireside, and so many horror stories (“The Monkey’s Paw,” “The Bodysnatchers,” “The Turn of the Screw,” to name a few) start by the fireside. Our narrator sits in a prison cell, but he does not expect your sympathy.  He is honest about his previous callousness.  Not only doesn’t he expect your sympathy; he doesn’t expect you to believe his story.  He proclaims: “For the most wild, yet most homely narrative which I am about to pen, I neither expect nor solicit belief.  Mad indeed would I be to expect it, in a case where my very senses reject their own evidence.”  Poe knows how to write an introduction.  Are you intrigued yet?  I was. Continue reading “Exploring Poe-tential Evil in “The Black Cat””

Exploring Poe-tential Evil in “The Black Cat”

A Room for Dying: Space and Place in “The Masque of the Red Death”

masque 2Because it’s Halloween, a little Poe seemed apropos. To be honest, I was looking for a short number that I could read and write about quickly before enjoying the public viewing of Psycho accompanied by the Erie Orchestra’s rendition of the original score. And, my boyfriend, Michael, and I want to go out to dinner before the movie. So here’s something quick to chew on for Halloween: Edgar Allen Poe’s “The Masque of the Red Death” heightens the terrifyingly unknown nature of death by sticking death in what we can essentially call a “non-place” and inverting biblical references. Continue reading “A Room for Dying: Space and Place in “The Masque of the Red Death””

A Room for Dying: Space and Place in “The Masque of the Red Death”