Surviving Horror When You’re Scared of EVERYTHING

Guest Writer: Michael J. Miller

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Photo Credit – Ghostbusters (1984)

I am a huge baby.  I don’t try to hide this.  When Kalie and I began dating two years ago I’d only seen one or two horror movies.  Why?  I don’t like being scared so I didn’t like them.  However, apparently part of being in a relationship is sharing each other’s interests soooo now I spend a lot of time watching horror movies.  Aaaagggh!!!  As I’ve embarked on this frightful foray into the world of horror (beginning with Annabelle and most recently A Cure For Wellness) I’ve come to appreciate and even enjoy the genre in my own way.  I’ve also developed a series of coping mechanisms so I can survive watching these films.  So, if you’re like me and you’re forced to watch you enjoy horror movies but are TERRIFIED while watching them, try these tricks!

Continue reading “Surviving Horror When You’re Scared of EVERYTHING”

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Surviving Horror When You’re Scared of EVERYTHING

A Cure for Wellness, A Cure for Ennui

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Photo Credit – A Cure for Wellness

So, I wrote about the sometimes-blasé nature of contemporary horror in a recent piece on The Bye Bye Man, a much hyped movie that turned out to be a dull, formulaic disappointment.  Shortly after, I embarked on a Shyamal-a-thon to mix things up; contrary to the flack he gets, I think M. Night makes a great, original movie with a unique vision.  But if you really want unique – and, that is, unique with a side of extra fucked-up (there’s no eloquent way to encapsulate the reality of this film) – look no further than Gore Verbinski’s A Cure For Wellness, which crawls under your skin like a festering amoeba and provokes distinct discomfort throughout what is, for horror, an epic-scale movie length: two and a half hours.  A Cure for Wellness is also a cure for boredom, for the common moviegoer and the volatile sadist alike.  But even as I write this, I find myself torn: do I spend a post emphasizing how uncomfortable and unconventional the film was, or do I explore some reasonably intelligent questions the film raises?  This, then, is my disclaimer: I have no idea how to begin to discuss this movie, so I can’t predict where this post will go.  I’ll try not to divulge the film’s big secret, but beyond that effort, I make no promises about anything.

Continue reading “A Cure for Wellness, A Cure for Ennui”

A Cure for Wellness, A Cure for Ennui

The Ring: Technophobia or Technophilia?

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Photo Credit – The Ring

I don’t remember the first time I saw The Ring, but it was probably in college over ten years ago.  Then there was a sequel that didn’t get much attention (I’ve never seen it).  Since a more advertised, more acclaimed sequel, Rings, came out yesterday (I intend to see it tonight and write about it thereafter) I thought it would be appropriate to dive into the American original, which is based off the utterly eerie Japanese Ringu.  Perhaps in part because its origin is Japanese – and thus beyond our cultural sphere – The Ring is a highly original horror and suspense classic, mixing an investigative mystery plot-line with sheer horror and eschewing a lot of horror film conventions for its own original storytelling.  But I intend to do more than sing The Ring’s praises in this piece – although I will, assuredly, do that.  I plan on looking at some binaries that construct the storytelling behind The Ring and examine what the film implies about our culture’s relationship to technology.  Continue reading “The Ring: Technophobia or Technophilia?”

The Ring: Technophobia or Technophilia?