A Room for Dying: Space and Place in “The Masque of the Red Death”

masque 2Because it’s Halloween, a little Poe seemed apropos. To be honest, I was looking for a short number that I could read and write about quickly before enjoying the public viewing of Psycho accompanied by the Erie Orchestra’s rendition of the original score. And, my boyfriend, Michael, and I want to go out to dinner before the movie. So here’s something quick to chew on for Halloween: Edgar Allen Poe’s “The Masque of the Red Death” heightens the terrifyingly unknown nature of death by sticking death in what we can essentially call a “non-place” and inverting biblical references. Continue reading “A Room for Dying: Space and Place in “The Masque of the Red Death””

A Room for Dying: Space and Place in “The Masque of the Red Death”

What’s in an Ending? – A Look at I Am Legend

Guest Writer – Michael J. Miller

Photo Credit - I Am Legend
Photo Credit – I Am Legend

In 2007 Will Smith starred as Robert Neville in I Am Legend, the second cinematic adaptation of Richard Matheson’s 1954 short story of the same name (the first being 1971’s The Omega Man).  I Am Legend is the story of one man left alone in a world of vampires.  The 2007 film received a fair bit of criticism for significantly departing from the plot of the novel, especially in regard to the ending.  However, personally, I think the changes were necessary (and quite brilliant).  We have three very different endings with three very specific challenges to the nature of our humanity. Continue reading “What’s in an Ending? – A Look at I Am Legend”

What’s in an Ending? – A Look at I Am Legend

A Halloween Horror Top Ten

HalloweenIn the spirit of Halloween, I’ve decided to list and explain my 10 favorite horror movies of all time.  I claim no authority with this list; I’m not a film critic.  These explanations are only rankings and scribblings by a sincere fan of the genre.  Disagree?  I’d love to hear about it. Continue reading “A Halloween Horror Top Ten”

A Halloween Horror Top Ten

All Vamped Out: Some Thoughts on the 1931 Version of Bram Stoker’s Dracula

DraculaThe local cinema was showing a Turner Classic Movie Dracula double feature: Tod Browning’s 1931, black and white version of Dracula, and the 1931 Spanish version of Dracula.  Of course there was no question; I was going to attend the event.  I’ll be honest:  I brought my trusty notepad with me, and I tried to scribble some comments in the pitch black theater while I was watching Bella Lugosi prey on the necks of fair young maidens.  Now I love a good black and white movie, if done well.  The 1963 version of The Haunting is one of my favorite horror movies, and I’ve been dying to see The Innocents.  But I’m hesitant to say that I’m a huge Dracula fan.  Don’t get me wrong – I enjoy seeing Bella Lugosi arch his eyebrows – but something about the film seemed incomplete.  The script was catchy, with quotable lines, but Browning’s film lacked the character development I find central to a truly well-made film. Continue reading “All Vamped Out: Some Thoughts on the 1931 Version of Bram Stoker’s Dracula”

All Vamped Out: Some Thoughts on the 1931 Version of Bram Stoker’s Dracula

Go for the Wendigo: What’s Appealing About this Classic Horror Story

dark forest 2So far this blog – dedicated to all that is slightly to majorly terrifying – has focused on contemporary T.V. shows and movies. But I have a broader objective. I want to explore all facets of horror in its myriad manifestations. I was browsing Barnes and Noble one idle Friday evening, seeking good horror between two covers. Michael, my significant other – who has an uncanny knack for sniffing out quality reads – found a decorative, hard-cover, 800 page Barnes and Noble collector’s edition entitled Classic Horror Stories, with a red ribbon bookmark and gold-trimmed pages, on the bargain shelf for $20. The book contains a lot of greats – Poe, unsurprisingly, Henry James, Bram Stoker, and Ambrose Bierce – but I thought I’d sample a lesser-known author, so I flipped to Algernon Blackwood’s telling of “The Wendigo.” Because Blackwood lived from 1869-1951, I estimate that it was written at the end of the 19th or the beginning of the 20th century. Though “The Wendigo” doesn’t float in the realm of “absolutely terrifying,” this relatively brief 40-page story is sufficiently creepy, with an undercurrent of dread pervading its well-established mood. Continue reading “Go for the Wendigo: What’s Appealing About this Classic Horror Story”

Go for the Wendigo: What’s Appealing About this Classic Horror Story

In Defense of Pet Sematary

ps 2Mary Lambert is no Stanley Kubrick. At least, that’s the contrast that comes to mind when pitting the film against another classic: it seems natural to compare two of Stephen King’s terrifying film adaptations, Pet Sematary and The Shining. While Stephen King reportedly didn’t like Kubrick’s adaptation of The Shining, the movie received broad acclaim and has been frequently canonized as a horror film classic. Just as frequently, Pet Sematary is excoriated as a poorly pieced together film with sub-par acting. To an extent, I agree; The Shining is a better film than Pet Sematary. But I don’t mean this as a shot at Pet Sematary. Few directors can compete with Stanley Kubrick. And frankly, while I like the acting in The Shining better, I think Pet Sematary is the scarier movie. Which brings me to my goal in this post: I intend to defend Pet Sematary against its detractors, and obviously the defense will contain massive spoilers. While, true, the acting in the film could be better, the film contains enough darkness and terror to satiate the most jaded horror fan.

Continue reading “In Defense of Pet Sematary”

In Defense of Pet Sematary

What Is It about It Follows?

Photo Credit - It Follows
Photo Credit – It Follows

We’ve all been attracted to someone without the ability to explain the attraction’s origin. You know that person you used to work with who you just couldn’t stop thinking about? A person you met at a party who allured you? Sometimes we’re just drawn to people without knowing why. Like, sure, the person is attractive, but what is it about this particular person that is so enticing? I think we’ve all been there: we’ve fallen victim to the unexplained crush. Well, It Follows is my inexplicable horror movie crush. When It Follows came to the theaters, my boyfriend, Michael, and I saw the movie four times. Michael doesn’t feel the same affection for horror that I do, but even he was gripped by the film. It’s such a delicate, subtle little film that’s doing so many things, but four times? Why did we see it four times? What is it about It Follows that makes it such fantastic cinema? I’m writing this piece to figure out what it is I love so much about this movie. Continue reading “What Is It about It Follows?”

What Is It about It Follows?